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Western Cape

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The Western Cape forms part of the nine provinces in South Africa. It is situated on the south-western coast part of the country. It is the fourth largest province in South Africa and the third most populated province in the country. About two-thirds of these inhabitants live in the metropolitan area of Cape Town, which is also the provinces capital. Its two largest cities are Cape Town and George. The province was created in 1994, from part of the former Cape Province.

The Black Conscious Movement (BCM) played a major role in the anti-apartheid movement. The student uprising that took place in 1976 in Soweto soon spread like wildfire to other provinces and soon after, the Western Cape was the epicentre of violence and clashes between the police and protesting students. According to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), the province experienced the second highest number of deaths and casualties associated with the 1976 protests.

The introduction of the interim constitution and the country’s landmark general elections in 1994, saw the abolishment of South Africa’s original provinces and the birth of the new nine provinces. The former Cape Province was split into four parts; the Western Cape, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape and a part of the North West. The Western Cape is a growing tourist attraction and attracts numerous tourist groups every single year, locally and internationally.

Robben Island is a popular tourist attraction. It is a former prison site with a museum. This is where former president, Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. Table Mountain National Park and the Lions Head, offers visitors with hiking trails, diverse flora and majestic views of the capital below it. Take a trip to the Iziko Bo-Kaap, where visitors are given a colourful experience on the local Islamic community. End your trip off at the V&A Waterfront. With a harbour and a commercial hub, you will never feel bored in the Western Cape.

The Western Cape forms part of the nine provinces in South Africa. It is situated on the south-western coast part of the country. It is the fourth largest province in South Africa and the third most populated province in the country. About two-thirds of these inhabitants live in the metropolitan area of Cape Town, which is also the provinces capital. Its two largest cities are Cape Town and George. The province was created in 1994, from part of the former Cape Province.

The Black Conscious Movement (BCM) played a major role in the anti-apartheid movement. The student uprising that took place in 1976 in Soweto soon spread like wildfire to other provinces and soon after, the Western Cape was the epicentre of violence and clashes between the police and protesting students. According to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), the province experienced the second highest number of deaths and casualties associated with the 1976 protests.

The introduction of the interim constitution and the country’s landmark general elections in 1994, saw the abolishment of South Africa’s original provinces and the birth of the new nine provinces. The former Cape Province was split into four parts; the Western Cape, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape and a part of the North West. The Western Cape is a growing tourist attraction and attracts numerous tourist groups every single year, locally and internationally.

Robben Island is a popular tourist attraction. It is a former prison site with a museum. This is where former president, Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. Table Mountain National Park and the Lions Head, offers visitors with hiking trails, diverse flora and majestic views of the capital below it. Take a trip to the Iziko Bo-Kaap, where visitors are given a colourful experience on the local Islamic community. End your trip off at the V&A Waterfront. With a harbour and a commercial hub, you will never feel bored in the Western Cape.